Citizen’s Violence and Crime Reduction Act of 2017 (#300): Ballot item approved and certified August 24

IT’S OFFICIAL AS OF AUGUST 24TH – THE CITIZENS VIOLENCE AND CRIME REDUCTION ACT OF 2017 WILL BE ON THE BALLOT
 
Over 30 Pueblo police officers were interviewed prior to Citizens for a Safe and Accountable collecting of almost 5,000 signatures to get on the November ballot – and all but one was in agreement that our City needs more than just more police officers to address our issues. The citizen group says Pueblo needs a combination of police and community programs programs to turn around our troubled city that hit state-wide and national news for being one of the worst cities for gun violence, murders, car thefts, heroin ods’ and more.
 
The act, which was modeled after legislation that improved other cities, calls for a complete turnaround of Pueblo over a ten year period, with the implementation of the most cutting edge police and community based programs so Pueblo can become a ‘role model turnaround city,” says it’s organizers who will soon be releasing a series of press releases and news articles coming soon to explain the legislation in depth and the programs that are pre-approved in the ballot item, and which types of programs will go through a national consultant, formal advisory panel made up of local community leaders, a program director, a grant manager and grant committee.
 
The legislation is fully accountable to the people of Pueblo, with audits of every program umbrella’d under “Safe Pueblo” legislation to ensure that all persons, organizations, non profits and programs created through this ordinance is working to reduce crime in Pueblo – especially targeting our at risk youth, young adults and most at need neighborhoods. The group is calling for a “United Pueblo” to promote this powerful legislation, created by citizens, for citizens – expect to see “Take Back Pueblo” and “Citizens for a Safe and Accountable Pueblo” post cards, flyers and yard signs all over Pueblo.
Over 4,600 locals, well over the 1,930 required by law to get on the ballot, signed the legislation in just 40 days in June and July and the group says the community was unbelievably supportive of the measures for change. Those collecting signatures say the “thank you’s,” “God bless you’s and overall gratitude towards their efforts was unbelievable.  Members say that such support proves that Pueblo is not just the city with the biggest heart – but a city that can prove to the world that it will be the “role model turn around city – through the meeting of the minds with the best, most diverse local minds, advised by national experts, guided by already proven elsewhere, evidence based programs, and continually adjusted and audited through a ten year period.
Here is the exact wording of the act:
 
THE CITIZENS VIOLENCE AND CRIME REDUCTION ACT OF 2017 – PETITION FOR INITIATIVE FOR THE NOVEMBER BALLOT:
 
A statement of the reasons for the proposed action as contemplated in the petition is as follows:
 
• This public safety measure, which may be cited as the “Citizens of Pueblo Violence and Crime Prevention Act,” addresses Pueblo’s current public safety emergency situation by proposing a large-scale, long-term community concerted effort to prevent violence and crime with two main components: the establishment of an innovative, collaborative network of evidence-based “Safe Pueblo Programs” and for more police officers, to include a new proactive “Community Policing Unit” of the Pueblo Police Department (PPD) and a Violence and Crime Reduction Unit.
 
• This proposed coordinated system to improve Pueblo’s public safety, which includes an investment of a miniscule one-quarter of one-cent sales tax ($0.0025), which will raise about $3.5 million per year, should provide a net savings to taxpayers in the long run by reducing arrests, convictions, recidivism and overall violence and crime in Pueblo within ten years, when voters may reapprove this entire Ordinance, or at just the Safe Pueblo Programs element of it, should the PPD be fully staffed, as it should be, without this ten year augmented tax.
 
• Pueblo’s public safety emergency situation escalated after the City was recently declared the most violent Colorado city per capita because of gun violence, drug activity and gang-related crime, occurring throughout the city, including at schools, work places and formerly safe residential neighborhoods. The negative labeling creates fear, disrupts business, deters tourism, depreciates the value of real estate and slows economic growth.
 
• Pueblo citizens deserve to feel safe in their homes and to enjoy parks, shopping, schools and the community free of fear of crime. However the City’s basic public safety has been compromised for years due to a lack of resources for police officers, community services and the types of innovative, evidence based violence and crime prevention programs commonly implemented elsewhere.
 
• Pueblo has lacked an appropriately staffed police department for years, operating with an average shortage of 60-70 officers, as compared to state and national average estimated in 2017 (calculated at 231 for Pueblo). This measure augments funding for an estimated 24 police officers (based on City calculations in their proposed 2018 1/5 cent tax for just 24 police officers and no programs) to help alleviate the emergency situation, and provides an accountability system for the City to maintain no fewer than their authorized number of 207 sworn police officers for the first five years, then 231 following, to maintain the faith and trust of taxpayers voting on this measure.
•. To address the deep-rooted social and cultural issues that contribute to Pueblo’s violence and crime, a Community Needs Assessment and Violence and Crime Prevention Strategy and Work Plan shall be co-produced with an outside consultant, under the oversight of a local advisory panel, to recommend enhanced and new prevention, intervention, treatment, outreach and re-entry nonprofit or agency services, implemented by Safe Pueblo Programs, using funds raised by this measure.
• The PPD’s new Community Policing Unit provided by this Ordinance shall consist of at least 11 Problem Solving Officers (10 police officers and one sergeant serving as Team Leader). Problem Solving Officers (PSOs) shall focus on specific neighborhoods, building interactive partnerships with Neighborhood Councils, citizens, leaders, organizations, nonprofits and other agencies.
 
• Problem Solving Officers (PSOs) shall co-produce strategic Neighborhood Crime Prevention Strategy and Work Plans for each of at least ten (10) geographic areas (beats), reporting crime statistics and achievements quarterly. PSOs shall be based out of the City funded PPD’s East, West and South Substations, with the Team Leader possibly headquartered at the main Department.
 
• The Violence and Crime Reduction Unit, with at least four police officers and one sergeant Team Leader (the ratio may be adjusted by the Police Chief), will be provided with extensive outside consulting and training to launch strategic violence and crime reduction initiatives, one of which may be cited as “Operation Ceasefire Pueblo,” replicated after a nationally renowned, data-driven approach, using tactics and strategies proven to reduce crime in U.S. cities.
 
• Local and outside experts shall provide ongoing consulting and collaborative efforts for local officers as they collaborate with other agencies such as the CBI and FBI to target Pueblo’s highest risk populations and highest crime neighborhoods, with investigations, patrols, raids and crack downs on violent gangs, street level drug markets, drug houses, sex trades and human trafficking.
 
• The PSOs and Violence and Crime Reduction Unit police officers described herein, and the additional eight police officers, who’s positions may be designated by the Police Chief, for a total of about 24 officers funded by this Ordinance, and other Members of the PPD, shall be provided with grant money from the Safe Pueblo Programs for training in the nation’s most cutting edge community policing and crime reduction techniques, for a more proactive, collaborative problem solving approach for violence and crime reduction.
 
• Oversight for the Safe Pueblo Programs shall be provided by a local Public Safety Advisory Panel, with advisement from local and outside consultants and periodic data-driven based evaluations by independent auditors, to ensure that programs and services provided for by this Ordinance progress towards objectives to create a safer, more secure community. The Panel shall also make certain that funds provided to the PPD follow the rules of this Ordinance. A Grant Manager and Grant Committee provides further checks and balances.
 
The full text of the proposed Ordinance, that is the subject of this petition, is as follows:
 
ORDINANCE NO._________
 
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING TITLE XIV OF THE PUEBLO MUNICIPAL CODE
BY THE ADDITION OF A NEW CHAPTER 13
 
BE IT ORDAINED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF PUEBLO, that (brackets
indicate matter being deleted; underscoring indicates new matter being added):
 
SECTION 1.
The Pueblo Municipal Code is hereby amended by the addition of a new Chapter 13 of Title XIV to read as follows:
 
CHAPTER 13
CITIZENS OF PUEBLO VIOLENCE AND CRIME PREVENTION ACT
 
Sec. 14-13-1 Intent.
 
The People of Pueblo hereby declare that on the effective date of this Ordinance, which may be cited as the “Citizens of Pueblo Violence and Crime Prevention Act,” that there shall be a one-quarter of one-cent ($0.0025) sales tax added to the rate in Section 14-4-85 solely for the purpose of raising revenue necessary to enhance, implement and retain programs and services to prevent violence and crime and to improve public safety in the City of Pueblo. Because the estimated $3.5 million in proceeds of the tax will be deposited in a special fund restricted for the services and programs specified herein, the tax is a special tax. The tax will not replace local funds already budgeted for public safety, nor shall it be offset by reductions in the budgeting of any position, operating expense or entity performing services for the City of Pueblo. The tax rates and rules set forth herein may not be amended by action of the Council without the applicable voter approval. This Ordinance should provide a net savings to taxpayers in the long run by reducing arrests, convictions, recidivism and overall violence and crime in Pueblo within ten (10) years, when voters may reapprove this entire Ordinance for more years, or can approve of just the Safe Pueblo Programs element of it, should the PPD be fully staffed with government provided funding, without this tax, by then, as it should be.
 
Sec. 14-13-2 Objectives.
 
The revenues raised from this Ordinance may be used only to pay for any costs and expenses relating to or arising from efforts to achieve the following objectives and desired outcomes:
 
a. Provide a broad and integrated network of violence and crime prevention, intervention and outreach services, community-based programs and facilities, with an emphasis on outreach to populations in most need, especially at-risk youth and young adults.
 
b. Provide funding for police officer salaries to include specialized community and neighborhood policing, training, crime suppression, investigations and initiatives with a focus on Pueblo’s highest risk populations and highest crime neighborhoods.
 
c. Reduce violence, homicides, robberies, burglaries, drug trafficking, drug houses, sex trading, human trafficking, illegal gang/group activities and overall crime.
 
Sec. 14-13-3 Allocations of Proceeds.
 
To achieve the objectives stated herein, with forty to forty-five percent (40-45%) of the total funds collected shall be designated for the Safe Pueblo Programs component of this Ordinance, which provides for a network of community-based services, programs and strategies. Up to ten percent (10%) the first two years (higher initially due to setup costs and initial outside consulting and attorney fees), then no less than five percent (5%) thereafter, of the total funds collected, shall be set aside for office expenses, staffing, consulting, legal fees, assessments, plans, training and independent evaluations of the programs provided herein. No less than forty five percent (45%) of the total proceeds shall be allocated for the police services component of this Ordinance the first two years, then no less than fifty percent (50%) thereafter, for an estimated twenty four (24) police officer salaries. Money raised shall not be used for wage or benefit increases of existing personnel. Specific Safe Pueblo Programs grant projects and programs are pre-approved herein, including that no less than $40,000 shall be allotted for education, training and seminars for police officers during the first year this Ordinance goes into effect, with no less than $15,000 allotted per year thereafter.
 
Sec. 14-13-4 Uses of Proceeds.
 
Adoption of this Ordinance shall establish the following:
 
a. Safe Pueblo Programs. A civilian Safe Pueblo Program Coordinator shall be responsible for strategically implementing the programs component of this legislation, or Safe Pueblo Programs, with any additional final approval of programs and funding, as required by law. The Coordinator shall propose budgets (with appropriation proposals approved by any governing authority as required by law) and funding strategies that align with the services delineated in this Ordinance. The Coordinator shall be based out of a centrally located office (Safe Pueblo Programs Resource Center), outside of City administrative buildings, possibly in a Safe Pueblo Programs funded community center, and shall be provided with the space, equipment, supplies and support staff to perform his or her job effectively. Safe Pueblo Programs shall build a broad and integrated network of best practice violence and crime prevention, intervention and outreach services. The network shall be involved in an extensive collaboration between various program providers and inter-agencies including social services, the school district, health department, the district attorneys office, the probation office, police, workforce agencies, criminal justice practitioners and other related entities.
 
Funding shall be provided for training, seminars and special education for the Coordinator and his or her staff, who shall provide ongoing training and technical assistance to funded programs. The Coordinator shall receive a professional pay consistent with his or her responsibilities. The Panel shall recruit, hire and remove candidates for the Coordinator position, and in the absence of a qualified candidate, the position may initially be filled by an outside consultant, until a professional is permanently hired, appointed by members of the Panel. Any additional managerial approval or dismissal of the Coordinator or any other position in this Ordinance, if legally questioned, may be determined by a Court of jurisdiction, respectful of the savings clause herein, and adhering to the precedence that other taxpayer funded program(s), including the special half (1/2) cent special tax that funds PEDCO, set preeminence as their Committee members (herein named Panel) choose their Program Director (herein named “Coordinator”), thus Safe Pueblo be grandfathered to do the same.
 
b. Public Safety Advisory Panel and Grant Committee. The Public Safety Advisory Panel shall oversee the proper administration of the revenue collection, the proposed spending, and the implementation of Safe Pueblo Programs and services funded through this Ordinance. The Panel shall make recommendations and shall help the Coordinator review budgets, annual financial audits and evaluations. Members of the ballot measure committee, Puebblo Citizens for Accountable Government, shall select members of an initial Screening Committee, a pool of at least twenty (20) persons, including local respected leaders and individuals, with experience in criminal justice, pastoral services, public health, social services, education, research, evaluation, finance, audits and/or public policy, and possibly family members of victims of crimes, will appoint the initial members of the Panel, who shall be charged with selecting initial members of the Public Safety Advisory Committee, confirmed by any authority required by law, which shall create procedures, protocols and system by which members will be elected and appointed after the initial members terms expire. The Panel shall also provide oversight for the policing component of this legislation, reviewing financials and reports to ensure that funds provided to the PPD follow the rules of this Ordinance.
 
The Panel shall be initially comprised of nine (9) members with experience in criminal justice,
pastoral services, public health, social services, education, research, evaluation, finance, audits and/or public policy and possibly family members of victims of crimes. At least two (2) members shall have experience working with the most at-risk target populations. The Panel may increase its membership by majority vote and may stipulate that any member be non-voting, advisory members to ensure that the Panel is least political in nature. At least one (1) non-voting, non-counted member shall be a Police Union Board appointed police officer and another one (1) shall be an officer of higher ranks. Should the Panel choose to increase their membership, the police officers may become voting members. The Police Chief may attend meetings, but shall not be a member. To prevent conflicts of interest, the Program Coordinator and Panel, with the approval of any other authority required by law, shall appoint a Grant Manager, to work under the supervision the Programs Coordinator, and an at least five (5) member Grant Committee to oversee the allocation of Safe Pueblo Programs grant funding. The Committee shall work in consultation with an outside consultant, appointed by the Programs Coordinator and Panel, with approval of any other authority required by law, to establish Committee by-laws and rules of operation for grants. The Grant Manager and Committee will draft requests fo proposals for a competitive bidding process for grants awarded with revenue from this program, and will monitor the compliance of the grantees under the guidance set forth by the Panel. All grantees will be audited by an outside source.
 
c. Violence and Crime Prevention Programs. Safe Pueblo Programs shall collaborate with an outside consultant, appointed by the Coordinator, Panel, and other authority required by law, to co-produce an initial Community Needs Assessment. The assessment shall address the deep-rooted social and cultural issues that contribute to violence and crime in Pueblo and provide an initial Resource Guide to programs available, recommending new and enhanced programs, using evidence based models from elsewhere as examples. The outside consultant will help produce a Pueblo Violence and Crime Prevention Strategy and Work Plan within the first year, and every two years to follow, to include short and long term goals, objectives and strategies, with measurable statistical benchmarks to be reviewed in annual audits. Recommendations shall be provided for specific enhanced and new programs and services that further the objectives set forth in this Ordinance, such as the following:
 
1. School-based education and training programs to teach students and families how to resist violence, gangs, bullying, drugs and other issues.
 
2. Research-based services, campaigns and initiatives for substance abuse prevention, treatment and recovery, with a strategy to combine criminal justice sanctions with substance abuse treatment to decrease drug abuse and related crime.
 
3. Re-entry programs to assist ex-offenders with short-term housing, job readiness, life skills training, mentorships and other services.
 
4. Activities, events, mentoring, outreach programs and summer campaigns to target at-risk youth, young adults and neighborhoods with populations in most need.
 
5. Recreational centers and facilities with programs for at-risk youth, young adults and families in targeted neighborhoods where crime, gangs and violence are most prevalent.
 
6. Self-sufficiency programs to include job readiness training, education, internships and employment opportunities, with a special emphasis on at-risk youth, young adults and ex-offenders.
 
7. Life coaching/intensive case management programs to re-direct highest risk individuals towards healthy participation in their families and communities through coaching, mentoring, advocacy and connection to local resources.
 
8. Street-based education and outreach programs to build relationships between outreach workers and youth, individuals and families to encourage healthy, productive and crime-free lives.
 
9. Neighborhood-based community policing programs to establish Neighborhood Councils and improve relations between citizens and law enforcement, with initiatives to target the small percentage of residents who are most violent and criminal.
 
10. Crisis response programs for victims of violence and crimes, with specific intervention strategies for victims of gun violence and for victims of sexual abuse and exploitation.
 
11. Other enhanced and new community-based nonprofit or agency programs with innovative and best practice approaches to violence and crime prevention and intervention.
 
d. Pre-Approved Safe Pueblo Programs. The following Safe Pueblo Programs are hereby
pre-approved, and shall be considered “established” in the initial Community Assessment, so that their setup can be expediated. The Programs Coordinator, Grant Manager and Grant Committee, with confirmation of any other authority required by law, shall as immediately as possible upon the enactment of this Ordinance, determine the funding amount and approve the following pilot
programs:
 
1. An innovative evidence-based and possibly named Pueblo Youthworks program (modeled in part after Sante Fe Youthworks) to provide at-risk and disadvantaged youth with training in various trades, alternative education, certifications, college preparation, internships, apprenticeships, and job placements. The youth advocacy program will also providing counseling for any immediate issues, crisis situations and life skills training to help Pueblo’s young people succeed.
 
2. A cutting-edge Music and Art Based Education Program (modeled in part after Denver’s Youth on Record) with space provided for a recording studio to be provided by Safe Pueblo Programs, where local musicians, artists, producers and peer counselors can mentor, help uplift and turn around the lives of at-risk youth and young adults. Scholarships for instruction and instruments shall be provided for those who might not otherwise have access to learning how to write, perform, record and produce songs, special events and videos.
 
3. A Response Team & Support Network (modeled in part after Oaklands) for those who have lost loved ones to violence or traumatic crime, or who have themselves been injured, addressing the basic and social-emotional needs of victims and/or their families, helping to deter and break the cycle of retaliatory and all violence and crime
 
4. Enhanced and/or new secular and non-secular Street Outreach and Life Coaching/Case Management Programs (modeled in part after Unite Oaklands) to redirect the highest at-risk youth and young adults towards healthy participation in their families and communities through coaching and mentoring, helping them mediate conflicts and connecting them to appropriate services and resources.
 
5. Preventative Crime Prevention and Intervention with gang, drug and crime prevention programs in district and the system, with an emphasis on the early detection of youth who might be most at risk to joining gangs, bullying and participating in criminal activities, helping connect them with school counselors and out of school mentors and programs.
 
6. Neighborhood Councils (modeled in part after Unite Oaklands) and Volunteer Programs. Problem Solving Officers (PSOs) shall be provided with an initial grant to work in collaboration with Safe Pueblo Programs and the PPD’s Neighborhood Watch employees to create Neighborhood Councils in at least ten (10) neighborhoods, to meet at least quarterly, to recruit volunteers and plan for initial neighborhood meetings and the first city-wide meeting of all Councils.
 
e. Geographic, Strategic and Problem Solving Policing. The at least eleven (11) specified PSOs and five (5) specified Violence and Crime Reduction Unit officers (ratio may be changed by thePolice Chief) described herein, plus the estimated eight (8) additional police officers, whose positions may be designated by the Police Chief, for an estimated twenty four (24) officers funded by this Ordinance, and other Members of the PPD, shall be provided with grant money for training in the nation’s most cutting edge community policing and crime reduction techniques, for a more proactive, collaborative problem solving approach for violence and crime reduction. The new Community Policing Unit, shall consist of at least ten (10) police officers and one (1) sergeant serving as Team Leader. PSOs shall focus on specific neighborhoods, building interactive partnerships with Neighborhood Councils, Neighborhood Watches, citizens, leaders, organizations and other agencies.
 
The PSOs will respond to calls for service in specific neighborhoods, will provide traditional, foot and bike patrols (providing business cards with each encounter with PSOs name and Safe Pueblo Programs resources), will attend Neighborhood Council, geographic and demographic meetings, will recruit volunteers, will help produce a website, newsletters and marketing materials, and will assist with programs, especially for at-risk youth and young adults. PSOs shall produce annual strategic Neighborhood Crime Prevention Strategy and Work Plans for each of at least ten (10) geographic areas (beats), reporting on a website and at regular Council meetings, crime statistics and achievements, at least quarterly. PSOs will be based out of the PPD’s East, West, South and any other Substations implemented hereafter, all funded by the City, not this Ordinance. The PSOs Team Leader may be headquartered at the main police department, preferably with a visible office at the entrance level of the building, to help improve the quality of interactions with the public.
 
At least four (4) police officers and one (1) sergeant (the ratio of which may be modified by the Police Chief), hired as members of the Violence and Crime Reduction Unit, shall launch strategic violence and crime reduction initiatives, one of which may be cited as “Operation Ceasefire Pueblo,” replicated after a nationally renowned, data-driven approach, using tactics and strategies proven to reduce gun violence in U.S. cities. Industry experts shall provide ongoing consulting for local officers as they collaborate with other agencies to target Pueblo’s highest risk populations and highest crime neighborhoods, with investigations, patrols, raids and crack downs on violent gangs, street level drug markets, drug houses, sex trades and human trafficking. The Safe Pueblo Program Coordinator and Public Safety Advisory Panel receive regular reports and may offer recommendations for training, education, initiatives and policies to members and management at the PPD and the City. A joint
annual Public Safety Summit of police officers, Neighborhood Councils, Neighborhood Watches, community members, City Council and agencies related to public safety shall be facilitated by PSOs and Safe Pueblo Programs to discuss issues, programs and services provided by this Ordinance.
 
Sec. 14-13-5 Auditing.
 
An independent data-based annual audit shall be performed to assure accountability and the proper disbursement of proceeds of this tax in accordance with the objectives stated herein. The auditor shall be appointed by the Safe Pueblo Program Coordinator and Public Safety Advisory Panel, approved by any other authority required by law.
 
Sec. 14-13-6 Special Provisions.
 
The intent of this augmented funding is to help maintain sufficient resources to allow for the implementation of comprehensive policing within the City’s resources and to begin and hopefully complete the process of increasing the sworn staffing of the PPD to a number crime reduction teams, problem solving officers and other sworn police personnel to meet the proposed minimum staffing herein, following the PPD’s stated mission to enhance the quality of life in Pueblo, to solve crime problems, to enforce the laws, preserve the peace, reduce fear and provide for a safe environment.
 
To ensure the PPD’s progress towards this mission the following shall apply:
 
a. Funds allocated by this measure will support an estimated 24 sworn police personnel positions above the 2017-2018 general purpose fund budgeted positions.
 
b. As early as practicable after the passage of this Ordinance, and at all times after July 1, 2020, the City should maintain a budgeted level of no fewer than two hundred and seven (207) sworn police
officers (not including the officers funded by this Ordinance) at all times. By 2023, the City should make its best efforts meet the state and national average of 2.1 police officers per 1,000, estimated to be two hundred and thirty one (231, to include the officers funded by this ordinance) sworn police
officers to maintain the faith and trust of taxpayers supporting this measure.
 
c. City Council shall adopt an annual sworn police personnel hiring plan, demonstrating how the City will achieve and maintain the strength of force suggested by this Ordinance, taking into account historic attrition rates, recruiting success, academy yield and other relevant factors affecting the growth or shrinkage of the department. Reports outlining the number of working sworn police officers shall be made public quarterly at regular Council meetings.
 
d. It the City, has, at any time, failed to budget for, hire and maintain a minimum of 207 sworn police personnel by July 1, 2020 and 231 by 2023, the City will, within 90 days, provide a report to the Panel and present at a regular Council meeting, justifications for such, with a plan of action to return to the said level. The Panel shall review the City’s reasons for the sworn police personnel falling short and their proposal to restore levels, and shall advise and make public probationary terms.
 
e. To receive funding from this Ordinance, the City shall finance (separate from funds from this Ordinance), reopen, maintain and provide support staff for East, West and South Substations, as mandated previously by voters, so that PSOs can base their community policing efforts out of the most at-risk neighborhoods.
 
f. If there is a legal dispute between the City or any other person(s) against any part of the Ordinance herein, the City of Pueblo, and not funding from this Ordinance, shall pay for all legal costs. Should there be a conflict of interest, the authors of this Ordinance respectfully request that the City not represent this Ordinance, and that the Court of jurisdiction mandate that the City pay for independent outside Council, and that the attorney or company, be selected by the Coordinator and Panel to represent the programs and members hired and appointed herein.
 
SECTION 2.
 
All Ordinances or parts of Ordinances in conflict herein are hereby repealed to the extent of such a conflict. If any part, sentence, subsection, sentence, clause, or phrase of this Ordinance is for any reason held to be invalid, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this Ordinance or of Chapter 13, Title XIV of the Pueblo Municipal Code. It is hereby declared to be the intention of the People of People, that the City would have adopted this Ordinance had such illegal or invalid provision, sentence, clause, section or part thereof not have been included herein.
 
SECTION 3.
 
The City Council, officers and staff of the City are authorized to perform any and all acts consistent with the intent of this Ordinance to effectuate the policies and procedures described herein.
 
SECTION 4.
 
This Ordinance shall become effective upon majority vote in favor thereof by the registered electors of the City voting thereon at the Regular Municipal Election to be held on Tuesday, November 7, 2017. The tax levies of this Chapter shall take effect beginning January 1, 2018. This tax shall expire in ten (10) years, December 31, 2027.
 
BALLOT TITLE – SUMMARY OF THE ORDINANCE THAT IS THE SUBJECT OF THIS INITIATIVE PETITION:
 
PUBLIC SAFETY TAX: SHALL THE CITY OF PUEBLO’S TAXES BE INCREASED BY $3.5 MILLION ANNUALLY (FIRST FULL FISCAL YEAR INCREASE) AND BY WHATEVER AMOUNTS ARE RAISED ANNUALLY THEREAFTER, FOR A TEN-YEAR PERIOD FROM JANUARY 1, 2018 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2027 BY ADOPTING AN ORDINANCE IMPOSING A ONE-QUARTER PERCENT CITY SALES AND USE TAX RATE AND SHALL THE CITY OF PUEBLO INCREASE COMMUNITY-BASED PROGRAMS FOR PREVENTION, EARLY INTERVENTION AND OUTREACH SERVICES TARGETING AT-RISK YOUTH, YOUNG ADULTS, AND FAMILIES, PROVIDE COMMUNITY POLICE OFFICERS IN EACH OF TEN NEIGHBORHOODS, AND IMPLEMENT A VIOLENCE AND CRIME PREVENTION UNIT, ALL SUBJECT TO ANNUAL PERFORMANCE AND FINANCIAL AUDITS MONITORED BY A CITIZENS OVERSIGHT PANEL AND SHALL TITLE XIV OF THE PUEBLO MUNICIPAL CODE BE AMENDED BY THE ADDITION OF A NEW CHAPTER 13 SECTION?

Southern Colorado Independent Magazine publisher Jenny Paulson is a 20 year veteran niche magazine publisher, an independent journalist, photographer, publisher, blogger, activist, world traveler and a proud mom. She has worked as a political activist, for a lobbyist, a pr firm, the governor and for a representative in Washington DC. She has lived in her home of Pueblo, CO ten years.

About Jenny Paulson 83 Articles
Southern Colorado Independent Magazine publisher Jenny Paulson is a 20 year veteran niche magazine publisher, an independent journalist, photographer, publisher, blogger, activist, world traveler and a proud mom. She has worked as a political activist, for a lobbyist, a pr firm, the governor and for a representative in Washington DC. She has lived in her home of Pueblo, CO ten years.
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